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UCI Chess Notation

Tool to display / translate a chess notation in UCI (Universal Chess Interface) format, composed of the coordinates of squares representing the moves (start-finish).

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UCI Chess Notation -

Tag(s) : Notation System, Board Games

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UCI Chess Notation

UCI coordinates Reader



Answers to Questions (FAQ)

What is UCI notation? (Definition)

In chess, the UCI notation (for Universal Chess Interface) is the writing used by the UCI protocol which allows communication between chess software.

How does UCI notation work?

The UCI format describes the movements of the pieces by encoding the start and end coordinates of the piece. The moves are therefore noted with 4 characters (letter, digit, letter, digit).

Example: d2d4 movement of the piece in coordinate d2 towards the square d4

The coordinate system of the chessboard is standard, in view from the white player (whose pieces are at the bottom): the columns are noted from a to h (from left to right) and the rows from '1 ' to 8 (bottom to top).

Case (uppercase and lowercase) is ignored, but the majority of the time the moves are all written in lowercase.

How to note a promotion?

The writing of the starting and ending squares makes it possible to describe the vast majority of moves, with the exception of promotions, which involve a player's choice as to the promoted piece. In this case, the notation changes to 5 characters, the letter of the piece is added at the end.

The allowed letters are: Q for Queen, B for Bishop, N for Knight, and R for Rook.

Example: e7e8q for a pawn promotion to Queen

How to note a castling?

The writing of the castling indicates the square of departure of the king and that of arrival of the king, not for the rook.

How to note en passant?

Writing a take en passant is nothing special, it includes the start square and the finish square, there is no ambiguity.

Source code

dCode retains ownership of the "UCI Chess Notation" source code. Except explicit open source licence (indicated Creative Commons / free), the "UCI Chess Notation" algorithm, the applet or snippet (converter, solver, encryption / decryption, encoding / decoding, ciphering / deciphering, breaker, translator), or the "UCI Chess Notation" functions (calculate, convert, solve, decrypt / encrypt, decipher / cipher, decode / encode, translate) written in any informatic language (Python, Java, PHP, C#, Javascript, Matlab, etc.) and all data download, script, or API access for "UCI Chess Notation" are not public, same for offline use on PC, mobile, tablet, iPhone or Android app!
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Cite as source (bibliography):
UCI Chess Notation on dCode.fr [online website], retrieved on 2024-06-15, https://www.dcode.fr/uci-chess-notation

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