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Shakespeare (Programming Language)

Tool to compile the programming language called Shakespeare (or SPL), an exotic language copying the way of writing of William Shakespeare.

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Shakespeare (Programming Language) -

Tag(s) : Programming Language

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Shakespeare (Programming Language)

Shakespeare Compiler



Answers to Questions (FAQ)

What is Shakespeare Programming Language? (Definition)

Shakespeare is a programming language (abbreviated as SPL for Shakespeare Programming Language) whose source code .SPL files resemble plays by William Shakespeare.

How to write using Shakespeare?

A program begins with the designation of the variables (which are necessarily characters from Shakespeare, such as Hamlet, Othello, etc.). Variables are integers described by a common name. If it is rather positive, then the value is +1, and if it is rather negative the value is -1. Any adjective associated with a noun multiplies it by 2.

Example: Juliet, a beautiful woman

The following describes acts and scenes whose names allow you to make gotos.

Example: Act I: Start

The instructions are dialogues/replicas of the characters.

Example: Romeo: You are nothing.

To display the contents of the current pointer, the phrases Open your heart! or Speak your mind! are used.

The program ends with [Exeunt]

Why is the Shakespeare compiler no longer available?

Due to its nature as natural language text, there are thousands of positive or negative words and the dictionaries used were not satisfactory. Most programs did not compile.

The most successful implementation currently is in Python: here (link) but is stille very limited (about 30 positive words and 30 negative words are accepted)

How to recognize a Shakespeare ciphertext? (Identification)

The text is in the form of a play, and uses Shakespeare's characters.

When Shakespeare was invented?

Shakespeare Programming Language was proposed by Karl Wiberg and Jon Åslund in 2001.

Source code

dCode retains ownership of the "Shakespeare (Programming Language)" source code. Except explicit open source licence (indicated Creative Commons / free), the "Shakespeare (Programming Language)" algorithm, the applet or snippet (converter, solver, encryption / decryption, encoding / decoding, ciphering / deciphering, translator), or the "Shakespeare (Programming Language)" functions (calculate, convert, solve, decrypt / encrypt, decipher / cipher, decode / encode, translate) written in any informatic language (Python, Java, PHP, C#, Javascript, Matlab, etc.) and all data download, script, or API access for "Shakespeare (Programming Language)" are not public, same for offline use on PC, tablet, iPhone or Android !
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Shakespeare (Programming Language) on dCode.fr [online website], retrieved on 2022-07-04, https://www.dcode.fr/shakespeare-programming-language

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Questions / Comments

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